Category Archives: Digital Collections

Early Forensics: The Dittrick Museum Blog

Are you interested in the contents of that lovely blue bottle? It is the subject of murder and mayhem in the 19th century–a plague if arsenic poisonings! Forensic science had a long history before CSI and other detective shows made … Continue reading

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Digital Collections Round Table #3

Welcome back to the Daily Dose–and to the third and last round table of our series on Digital Collections! We have been very privileged to host a number of wonderful people over the past few months, such as Medical Heritage … Continue reading

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The Daily Dose Presents: The National Library of Medicine

Welcome back to the Daily Dose! A few weeks ago, we featured the National Library of Medicine on the Dose.  The NLM itself is the world’s largest biomedical library with a collection of over twelve million books, journals, manuscripts, audiovisuals, … Continue reading

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Digital Collections Round Table #2

Welcome back to the Daily Dose–and to the second round tables of our first series on Digital Collections! We have been very privileged to host a number of wonderful people over the past few months, such as Medical Heritage Library, … Continue reading

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Digital Collections Round Table

Welcome back to the Daily Dose–and to the culmination of our first series on Digital Collections: the Roundtable. We have been very privileged to host a number of wonderful people over the past few months, Including the Medical Heritage Library, … Continue reading

Posted in Digital Collections, Medical History, Special Feature, The Daily Dose | 1 Comment

The Daily Dose Presents: The New York Academy of Medicine

Welcome back to the Daily Dose! In the past few months, we have been featuring a series of libraries and museums, all of which utilize digital platforms for outreach. These archivists, librarians, and curators–keepers of the historically significant–will be joining … Continue reading

Posted in Digital Collections, Medical History, Medical Humanities, The Daily Dose | 2 Comments

The Daily Dose Present: Robert L. Brown History of the Health Sciences Collection

Welcome back to the Daily Dose! Recently, I have been presenting a series on digital collections–the pubic outreach of museums and libraries in this, our digital age. Today, I am happy to present the Robert L. Brown History of the … Continue reading

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The Daily Dose Presents: NYAM Festival featuring Morbid Anatomy

New on the Daily Dose! A Press Release from NYAM! FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:                                                                     NYAM’s Center for the History of Medicine and Public Health Launches New Festival on Saturday, October 5 Dr. Oliver Sacks and a rarely screened … Continue reading

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The Daily Dose Presents: The Melnick Musuem

Welcome back to the Daily Dose! We are winding up our series on Digital Collections, and will be hosting the last of our Summer/Fall contributors in the coming weeks. In October, we will have a round table discussion among these … Continue reading

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The Daily Dose Presents: The National Library of Medicine

Welcome back to the Daily Dose! In the past few weeks, we have been featuring various museum and library collections, and today I have the pleasure of presenting the National Library of Medicine. An agency of the United States government, … Continue reading

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